Microworlds Move Mountains

Your world is tiny, but it’s detailed and it’s beautiful and it’s you. There are somewhere around 7 billion people living on this planet and yet you will probably never see most of them. You’ll never hear their voices, or see their faces, or know their stories, and they won’t know yours. An article published by Forbes explains, that the average person can create meaningful relationships with around 150-250 people at a time. This is known as “Dunbar’s Number,” which addresses the limits of the mind’s ability to retain information about other people and incorporate them into our own tiny worlds.

This notion at first seemed disappointing, and creates a sense of serious FOMO for all the people you might never meet who could really change your life for the better. Looking deeper, I find this concept beautiful, in that it allows us to build our own worlds and create more detailed relationships with the people around us. Quality friends over quantity. The natural world reflects this with tiny creatures creating their own little spaces within a vast ecosystem.

These baby slugs and millipedes have created a world of their own on a tree stump in the forest. Their whole life is on or near this stump of tree that once was so much more, and now the stump, and the slugs, and the mushrooms, and me all coexist in one moment. Then I left their tiny world, and went back to my own.

That’s the strange and wonderful part about being the center of your own universe. You have the power to determine where you build it, who is allowed in an out, and how you want to impact those 150 people Dunbar says you’re going to change. Some spiders build their webs between the bark of a dark tree, others in between a flower and it’s leaves. Some people spend more time going through the grass like this caterpillar. It doesn’t matter where or how or why you build your world the way that you do. All that matters is that you fill it with people who bring you joy, pass by the ones who cut you down, and are conscious that you might one of those 150 people leaving a mark on someone else.

Even if you are the smallest, palest, loneliest flower among a field of big orange blossoms, you matter. Your world is important, and it is vital to the the larger ecosystem around you. At the end of the day our worlds might be small, but the chaos and magic you create while wrapped up in the bubble of your inner circle can make a difference that stretches across oceans and back again. What you are doing is important, where ever you are at.

One Comment on “Microworlds Move Mountains

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